RAJ CAIRNS REPORT


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Why is the Port of Cairns caught up in the BATTLE OF GALILEE ——The Greenpeace war against THE AUSTRALIAN COAL INDUSTRY————–The coal ports at Abbot Point and Dudgeon Point are both next to the World Heritage listed Great Barrier Reef Marine Park and there are strong opportunities for alliance building with scientists and industries that will be negatively impacted (fishing, tourism, etc). We will build a powerful narrative about the global importance of the Galilee Basin and use this to build a high profile public campaign to put the issue in the national and international spotlight. Proposal Budget Level 1 investment 3 x community organizers + overhead costs $270,000 Expert scientific support (hydrology, marine, climate etc) $50,000 Events, outreach and organizing costs $65,000 Reports, publications and creative materials (online & offline) $50,000 Subtotal $435,000 Level 2 investment (additional to level 1) 3 x community organizers + overhead costs $270,000 Senior campaigner + operating costs $110,000 Events, outreach and organizing costs $70,000 Additional budget for scien:fic support $40,000 Subtotal $490,000


 

4.2 The Battle of Galilee Background/context: With roughly 240Mtpa of proposed new coal mines, the Galilee Basin in central Queensland is a globally significant fossil fuel development. If it proceeds as planned, the coal burnt from the Galilee Basin would use up roughly 6.7% of the total remaining allowable global carbon budget to 20501 . Indian and Chinese investors are proposing a series of vertically integrated ‘mega mines’ where they own and build the mine, rail line and port. Currently, the area is not serviced by a rail line and there is no additional port capacity in the region. Port expansions at Abbot Point and Dudgeon Point, as well as the rail line linking these ports to the Galilee Basin are critical bottlenecks for the industry. Theory of change: The Galilee Basin coal mines are already at the expensive end of the global coal production cost curve. By building a high profile public campaign to disrupt and delay, we can significantly increase investor uncertainty while undermining political support. This in turn may result in less Government subsidies for the projects, and/or stricter approval conditions, further driving up costs and increasing risks. Extensive delays may also make the projects run foul of a changing global coal investment environment. Objectives: 1. Organize the non-cooperation of landowners along the rail corridor and mine sites (Level 1); 2. Build an alliance of groups opposing coal port expansions (Level 1); 3. Launch a high profile public campaign to put the Galilee Basin under the national and international spotlight as a globally significant carbon bomb (Level 2). What this looks like: The first step is detailed research into the impacts to identify opportunities to stop, limit or delay the developments – looking at groundwater threats, endangered species habitat, financing of infrastructure and mines, economic impacts etc. Local organising of landowners can help to delay development of both the mines and rail line. The coal ports at Abbot Point and Dudgeon Point are both next to the World Heritage listed Great Barrier Reef Marine Park and there are strong opportunities for alliance building with scientists and industries that will be negatively impacted (fishing, tourism, etc). We will build a powerful narrative about the global importance of the Galilee Basin and use this to build a high profile public campaign to put the issue in the national and international spotlight. Proposal Budget Level 1 investment 3 x community organizers + overhead costs $270,000 Expert scientific support (hydrology, marine, climate etc) $50,000 Events, outreach and organizing costs $65,000 Reports, publications and creative materials (online & offline) $50,000 Subtotal $435,000 Level 2 investment (additional to level 1) 3 x community organizers + overhead costs $270,000 Senior campaigner + operating costs $110,000 Events, outreach and organizing costs $70,000 Additional budget for scien:fic support $40,000 Subtotal $490,000

 

www.abc.net.au/mediawatch/transcripts/1206_greenpeace.pdf.


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Battle for the Reef – Four Corners


Four Corners and reporter Marian Wilkinson take you inside the agency that approved one of the most contentious environmental decisions this year. In January, the body tasked with protecting the Great Barrier Reef approved a plan to dump three million cubic metres of dredge spoil inside the marine park to expand the Abbot Point coal port.

The decision by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority has shocked and angered the scientific community. Internal documents obtained by Four Corners reveal deep divisions between the scientists and bureaucrats behind the decision. They show that the dumping was approved despite previous recommendations from senior scientists that it be rejected.

“That decision has to be a political decision. It is not supported by science at all, and I was absolutely flabbergasted when I heard.” – Dr Charlie Veron, marine scientist

But the Chairman of the Marine Park Authority denies the decision was political and the Federal Environment Minister insists it will take place under the strictest environmental conditions.

Four Corners speaks to a senior director who recently left the Authority. He says bluntly that the dumping should not go ahead.

The dumping approval also comes as scientists are confirming a link between port dredging and deadly coral disease for the first time.

This week the Marine Park Authority released a report showing the Great Barrier Reef has significantly declined in just the last five years. It confirms climate change and ocean acidification are threatening the very survival of the reef.

It all comes at a critical moment in the reef’s history. In June, UNESCO’s World Heritage Committee criticised the dumping decision. Next year it will decide whether to place the Great Barrier Reef on the World Heritage “In Danger” list.

“We’re dealing with a World Heritage area, the most important World Heritage area on the planet… Our own legislative mandate says ‘the long-term protection and conservation of the values’, and we’re not doing that.” – former director, Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

BATTLE FOR THE REEF, reported by Marian Wilkinson and presented by Kerry O’Brien, goes to air on Monday 18th August at 8.30pm. It is replayed on Tuesday 19th August at 11.00am and 11.35pm. It can also be seen on ABC News 24 on Saturday at 8.00pm, ABC iview.

 

 

 

Battle for the Reef – Four Corners.


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STOP COAL –The GREENPEACE PLAN AND STRATEGY————–The first priority is to get in front of the critical projects to slow them down in the approval process. This means lodging legal challenges to five new coal port expansions, two major rail lines and up to a dozen of the key mines. This will require significant investment in legal capacity. While this is creating much needed breathing space, we need to continue to build the movement and mobilize to create pressure on politicians and investors alike. We cannot win by taking the industry head-on and there is no single point of intervention that we can rely upon. We need a strategy that uses multiple voices with multiple points of intervention.


The first priority is to get in front of the critical projects to slow them down in the approval process. This means lodging legal challenges to five new coal port expansions, two major rail lines and up to a dozen of the key mines. This will require significant investment in legal capacity. While this is creating much needed breathing space, we need to continue to build the movement and mobilize to create pressure on politicians and investors alike. We cannot win by taking the industry head-on and there is no single point of intervention that we can rely upon. We need a strategy that uses multiple voices with multiple points of intervention. Our strategy is essentially to ‘disrupt and delay’ key projects and infrastructure while gradually eroding public and political support for the industry and continually building the power of the movement to win more. There are 6 elements to this strategy: 1. Disrupt and delay key infrastructure Challenge and delay key infrastructure developments (ports and rail) and ‘mega mines’. 2. Constrain the space for mining Build on the outrage created by coal seam gas to win federal and state based reforms to exclude mining from key areas, such as farmland, nature refuges, aquifers, and near homes. Landowners locking the gate. 3. Increase investor risk Create uncertainty and a heightened perception of risk over coal investments; 4. Increase costs Increasing the cost of coal is fundamental to the long-term global strategy to phase out the industry. We can start to remove the massive subsidies to the coal industry, and to internalize the ‘externalized’ costs of coal; 5. Withdraw the social license of the coal industry Change the story of coal from being the backbone of our economy, to being a destructive industry that destroys the landscape and communities, corrupts our democracy, and threatens the global climate. 6. Build a powerful movement Create stronger networks and alliances and build the power necessary to win larger victories over time.

 

 

 

 

The Need: Australia is on the verge of a coal boom that is unprecedented in both scale and speed • With around 120 new mines or expansions, matched with massive rail and port expansions, coal exports are set to triple by the end of the decade. • If the industry expands unchecked, it will undermine efforts to curtail coal exports from the United States, will ensure coal supplies for a new generation of coal power stations in India, and will have devastating consequences for the global climate. • If built on schedule, the coal from the Galilee Basin alone would use up around 7% of the total global allowable carbon budget out to 2050 – creating a global climate tipping point. • 2012 and 2013 are critical years to intervene in order to stop tens of billions of dollars of investment being locked in. • We urgently need to build the anti-coal movement and mobilise off the back of the community backlash to coal seam gas. If we fail to act decisively over the next two years, it will be too late to have any chance of stopping almost all of the key infrastructure projects and most of the mega-mines. The Strategy: Our strategy is to ‘disrupt and delay’ key projects and infrastructure while gradually eroding public and political support for the industry and continually building the power of the movement to win more. Outcomes: By prioritizing infrastructure campaigns, our aim is to delay the proposed increase in export capacity substantially (by several years). While it is not yet possible to quantify the long-term impact we might have, we aim to severely reduce the overall scale of the coal boom by some hundreds of millions of tonnes per annum from the proposed 800Mtpa increase. The Proposal: • We are seeking investment to help us build a nation-wide coal campaign that functions like an orchestra, with a large number of different voices combining together into a powerful symphony. • The proposed campaign program has multiple projects that contribute to one another and overlap. • Prospects are broken down into two levels. Level 1 is the base level of resourcing that is required to have an impact. Level 2 is where we need to take the program to in order to have maximum impact. Level 1 Level 2 1. Litigation $395,000 $955,000 2. The Battle of Galilee $435,000 $490,000 3. Hunter Valley – Enough is Enough! $354,000 $260,000 4. Forward defence in W.A. and Victoria $160,000 $120,000 5. Changing the Story of Coal $275,000 $390,000 6. Creating Investor Uncertainty $40,000 $180,000 7. Exposing the Health Impacts of coal $30,000 $70,000 8. Field Organising Program $180,000 $940,000 9. Movement Support $195,000 $220,000 10. Program management $130,000 $100,000 Total $2,194,000 $3,725,000 Program Management: • Two steering groups, made up of Australia’s leading coal, campaign leadership and strategy experts, will advise the program manager regarding allocation of funds and the overall implementation, management and evaluation of the program.

 

 

 

 

www.abc.net.au/mediawatch/transcripts/1206_greenpeace.pdf.


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Why do GREEN voters preferance LABOR , when they are disregarded after the election——-Dredging in Great Barrier Reef allowed but not with taxpayer money, says Labor | Environment | The Guardian——————-However, Queensland Greens senator Larissa Waters said the climate impacts of opening up the Galilee meant “effectively signing a death warrant for the Great Barrier Reef”. “A lot of Queenslanders [in the recent state election] voted to protect the reef and they’re going to be really disappointed that Labor is now facilitating not just dredging and increased shipping through the reef but also massive climate impacts when we know, because scientists tell us, that climate change is the biggest threat to the reef,” she said.


However, Queensland Greens senator Larissa Waters said the climate impacts of opening up the Galilee meant “effectively signing a death warrant for the Great Barrier Reef”.

“A lot of Queenslanders [in the recent state election] voted to protect the reef and they’re going to be really disappointed that Labor is now facilitating not just dredging and increased shipping through the reef but also massive climate impacts when we know, because scientists tell us, that climate change is the biggest threat to the reef,” she said.

 

 

 

 

Dredging in Great Barrier Reef allowed but not with taxpayer money, says Labor | Environment | The Guardian.


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Why are the GREENS and LABOR allowing ABOTT POINT PORT to be dredged , when it is supporting one of the most destructive Projects the Earth has ever seen——- Is any bank dumb enough to fund the Galilee Basin coalapolooza? | Bill McKibben | Comment is free | The Guardian———————The fact that whoever lends money for Galilee coal is going to be underwriting one of the most destructive projects the earth has ever seen. There’s that large reef in the neighborhood that for some reason people care about, and then there’s the planet’s, you know, climate. This one basin could take us 6% of the way past the two-degree rise in temperature that the world’s governments have set as the ultimate red line. Can you say “reputation risk?” Wouldn’t it be interesting to have every activist on earth campaigning against your bank all at once?


  1. The fact that whoever lends money for Galilee coal is going to be underwriting one of the most destructive projects the earth has ever seen. There’s that large reef in the neighborhood that for some reason people care about, and then there’s the planet’s, you know, climate. This one basin could take us 6% of the way past the two-degree rise in temperature that the world’s governments have set as the ultimate red line. Can you say “reputation risk?” Wouldn’t it be interesting to have every activist on earth campaigning against your bank all at once?

 

 

 

Is any bank dumb enough to fund the Galilee Basin coalapolooza? | Bill McKibben | Comment is free | The Guardian.

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