RAJ REPORT

STOP COAL –The GREENPEACE PLAN AND STRATEGY————–The first priority is to get in front of the critical projects to slow them down in the approval process. This means lodging legal challenges to five new coal port expansions, two major rail lines and up to a dozen of the key mines. This will require significant investment in legal capacity. While this is creating much needed breathing space, we need to continue to build the movement and mobilize to create pressure on politicians and investors alike. We cannot win by taking the industry head-on and there is no single point of intervention that we can rely upon. We need a strategy that uses multiple voices with multiple points of intervention.

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The first priority is to get in front of the critical projects to slow them down in the approval process. This means lodging legal challenges to five new coal port expansions, two major rail lines and up to a dozen of the key mines. This will require significant investment in legal capacity. While this is creating much needed breathing space, we need to continue to build the movement and mobilize to create pressure on politicians and investors alike. We cannot win by taking the industry head-on and there is no single point of intervention that we can rely upon. We need a strategy that uses multiple voices with multiple points of intervention. Our strategy is essentially to ‘disrupt and delay’ key projects and infrastructure while gradually eroding public and political support for the industry and continually building the power of the movement to win more. There are 6 elements to this strategy: 1. Disrupt and delay key infrastructure Challenge and delay key infrastructure developments (ports and rail) and ‘mega mines’. 2. Constrain the space for mining Build on the outrage created by coal seam gas to win federal and state based reforms to exclude mining from key areas, such as farmland, nature refuges, aquifers, and near homes. Landowners locking the gate. 3. Increase investor risk Create uncertainty and a heightened perception of risk over coal investments; 4. Increase costs Increasing the cost of coal is fundamental to the long-term global strategy to phase out the industry. We can start to remove the massive subsidies to the coal industry, and to internalize the ‘externalized’ costs of coal; 5. Withdraw the social license of the coal industry Change the story of coal from being the backbone of our economy, to being a destructive industry that destroys the landscape and communities, corrupts our democracy, and threatens the global climate. 6. Build a powerful movement Create stronger networks and alliances and build the power necessary to win larger victories over time.

 

 

 

 

The Need: Australia is on the verge of a coal boom that is unprecedented in both scale and speed • With around 120 new mines or expansions, matched with massive rail and port expansions, coal exports are set to triple by the end of the decade. • If the industry expands unchecked, it will undermine efforts to curtail coal exports from the United States, will ensure coal supplies for a new generation of coal power stations in India, and will have devastating consequences for the global climate. • If built on schedule, the coal from the Galilee Basin alone would use up around 7% of the total global allowable carbon budget out to 2050 – creating a global climate tipping point. • 2012 and 2013 are critical years to intervene in order to stop tens of billions of dollars of investment being locked in. • We urgently need to build the anti-coal movement and mobilise off the back of the community backlash to coal seam gas. If we fail to act decisively over the next two years, it will be too late to have any chance of stopping almost all of the key infrastructure projects and most of the mega-mines. The Strategy: Our strategy is to ‘disrupt and delay’ key projects and infrastructure while gradually eroding public and political support for the industry and continually building the power of the movement to win more. Outcomes: By prioritizing infrastructure campaigns, our aim is to delay the proposed increase in export capacity substantially (by several years). While it is not yet possible to quantify the long-term impact we might have, we aim to severely reduce the overall scale of the coal boom by some hundreds of millions of tonnes per annum from the proposed 800Mtpa increase. The Proposal: • We are seeking investment to help us build a nation-wide coal campaign that functions like an orchestra, with a large number of different voices combining together into a powerful symphony. • The proposed campaign program has multiple projects that contribute to one another and overlap. • Prospects are broken down into two levels. Level 1 is the base level of resourcing that is required to have an impact. Level 2 is where we need to take the program to in order to have maximum impact. Level 1 Level 2 1. Litigation $395,000 $955,000 2. The Battle of Galilee $435,000 $490,000 3. Hunter Valley – Enough is Enough! $354,000 $260,000 4. Forward defence in W.A. and Victoria $160,000 $120,000 5. Changing the Story of Coal $275,000 $390,000 6. Creating Investor Uncertainty $40,000 $180,000 7. Exposing the Health Impacts of coal $30,000 $70,000 8. Field Organising Program $180,000 $940,000 9. Movement Support $195,000 $220,000 10. Program management $130,000 $100,000 Total $2,194,000 $3,725,000 Program Management: • Two steering groups, made up of Australia’s leading coal, campaign leadership and strategy experts, will advise the program manager regarding allocation of funds and the overall implementation, management and evaluation of the program.

 

 

 

 

www.abc.net.au/mediawatch/transcripts/1206_greenpeace.pdf.

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