RAJ REPORT

Greens thrown “UNDER THE BUS ” by Labor,who will be next ——I think ERGON WORKERS—–To throw (someone) under the bus is an idiomatic phrase in American English meaning to sacrifice a friend or ally for selfish reasons.

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HERE IS A SAMPLE – PHONE TRANSCRIPT CASTLEY-WRIGHT/TRAD 20 JAN 2015

DECIDE FOR YOURSELF WHETHER THIS IS NEGOTIATING A DEAL

Noel Castley-Wright – ‘And at the end of the day, you know what, you need my ten percent…’

Noel Castley-Wright – ‘… I know the value of what I have on the table. And what I am asking you for is nowhere near the value of what I am giving you’

AND

Jackie Trad – ‘Alright Noel, can I say even before we needed your ten per cent…’

AND

Jackie Trad – ‘Well, I’m, I’m happy to give you the commitment and put this in writing in the, in the letter as well to you that, you know, we actually believe in listening to the experts and listening to the scientists’

Noel Castley-Wright – ‘Yep’

Jackie Trad – ‘If the, what, if the arborists are saying that this tree can recover and, you know, and it should be maintained, then we are happy to support that Noel’

Noel Castley-Wright – ‘Yep’

Jackie Trad – ‘But, we are happy to support that. There was no reason, unless there is a significant public safety issue at play here, which, you know, has been an issue in my electorate’

THE LEADING ARBORIST IN THE COUNTRY STATES THE TREE CAN BE BRACED, MADE SAFE TO THE PUBLIC AND REMOVAL SHOULD BE THE LAST RESORT

 

 

8 hrs · To throw (someone) under the bus is an idiomatic phrase in American English meaning to sacrifice a friend or ally for selfish reasons. It is typically used to describe a self-defensive disavowal and severance of a previously-friendly relationship when the relation becomes controversial or unpopular.

The phrase has been widely popularized by sports journalists since 2004[citation needed] and was picked up by the mainstream media during the 2008 political primary season. It has frequently been used to describe various politicians distancing themselves from suddenly unpopular or controversial figures whom the candidate has previously allied themselves with. David Segal, a writer for The Washington Post, calls the expression “the cliché of the 2008 campaign“.[1]

In a March 2008 NPR report, the linguist Geoff Nunberg noted that “under the bus” “has appeared in more than 400 press stories on the campaign over the last six months

 

 

 

Noel Castley-Wright.

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